5 Simple Tips For Teaching With Technology

With instructional strategies, data collection, curricular planning, personal communication, and classroom management to consider, where technology fits in to a teacher’s workday isn’t obvious—especially a new teacher. But if you can consider technology as a macro tool rather than a micro task, this simple paradigm shift can make all the difference.

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1. Think Function First

As you approach technology, think first of what it is doing. What exactly it is doing.

To do this, you’ll need to observe some barrier to learning—otherwise the technology use is, at best, gratuitous, and at worst, leading students away from what you’re wanting them to come to understand. Rather than think “What’s a cool way to use twitter?”, you might notice that students are missing out on real-world access to content experts. Then you might notice that blogging, twitter, and RSS feeds are all three powerful ways to connect students to said experts.

Technology use here becomes strategic, intentional, and more likely to result in additional capacity for learning with technology.

2. Let Students Lead

Students may or may not know technology better than you. This is difficult to judge because their knowledge here can be so uneven.

Regardless, they likely know it differently than you do. So let them lead. Let them choose new applications for existing technology—a new way to use Evernote, or a smarter way to use hyperlinking in Microsoft Word. Let them corral emerging trends in social media use and work them into the learning process. Let them figure out the logistics of turning work in, sharing feedback, and maintaining a digital portfolio.

While this is necessary in a BYOD environment, it is possible anywhere.

3. Start With What You Know

While you’ll gradually need to push yourself out of your comfort zone, start where you’re comfortable—and not comfortable as a teacher, but as a technology user yourself.

If you’re an avid user of facebook or pinterest, figure out a compelling way to integrate it into the learning process. Same with your Android smartphone or the new digital multi-meter you just picked up on Amazon. This will help you learn how technology actually works in the learning process while not having to juggle mastering a new technology while you’re at it.

As a new teacher, you’ve got enough going on.

4. Experiment Constantly

Whatever you do as you grow as a teacher, do not become complacent. Step out of your comfort zone, seek out better ways to complete the mundane tasks that sabotage your free time, and try new things with technology.

This experimentation can come as the result of collaboration with your professional learning network, business leaders in the community, or the students themselves. Make sure that in your daily use of social media, physical print, or in-person observation you have access to powerful uses of technology, or your “idea well” will be self-contained and likely unsustainable.

5. It’s Not About Your Comfort Level

Both new and experienced teachers will need to prioritize what’s most important in their classroom. There’s only so much time and so many resources. This is understandable.

For new teachers, before you know it your first year becomes your fourth, and built-in habits that were formed during the storm of your first classroom experience can be difficult to even see, much less break.

For experienced teachers, constantly seeing education technology with fresh eyes can help you seefunction first while also staying ahead of emerging trends. If you hold fast to this app or thatoperating system you risk creating your own personal learning environment rather than one for your students.

Resisting this requires a solid framework for technology integration from the beginning that is catalyzed by your own interests and passion, but is also interdependent with students, experts, and your global learning network.

Don’t be afraid to fail; everyone fails. Just be sure that failure comes in pursuit of better technology integration that is dynamic and evolving, rather than a stunted system of tried-and-true that will eventually catch up to you in your career.

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